We arrived at Kenosha Pass Campground late Friday night. Two and a half hours in the car after a full day of working and packing made our temporary home for the weekend even more welcoming. Instead of attempting to back the trailer into our narrow spot, we pulled the truck straight in, minimally set up camp, and crashed – just before midnight.

Morning greeted us with warm sunlight and the sounds of birds and rustling aspen leaves all around. One by one, we groggily emerged from our trailer, hungry but happy. After rearranging the truck and trailer, Andy made a pot of strong coffee as I whipped up our usual camp breakfast. Without missing a beat, Luke swiped our bag of marshmallows and planted himself in his chair by the fire. He shoved one marshmallow after another into his mouth, enjoying every single bite.

A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com
A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com
A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com

We leisurely ate breakfast and sipped our coffee while we talked about plans for the rest of the summer and the remainder of our planned time in Colorado. Before long, the sun was high in the sky and it was time to get cleaned up and ready for our hike for the day: a short, out-and-back hike along Segment 6 of the Colorado Trail.

A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com
A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com
A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com
A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com

Paintbrush, columbine, and wild roses bloomed up and down the trail. Thru-hikers and mountain bikers waved as they passed. Andy and Luke spotted and explored lean-to after lean-to, some of which were rather impressive. After some time, we emerged from the aspens and hiked along the trail in full view of South Park Valley and the Mosquito Range mountains to the west. Andy and I took turns snapping an obscene number of photos as we gasped at the beautiful view.

We made our way in and out of the trees until we reached a rock outcropping with an incredible view of Fairplay below. We stripped off our backpacks, pulled out our snacks, and did our best to wave off a brave little chipmunk who thought we’d come to picnic with him. A sweet old couple took a family photo for us, then we loaded up the packs and the kids and started back for the campground.

A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com
A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com
A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com

It was hot but breezy back at our site. We changed our sweaty, dirty clothes, made a late lunch, and sat in our chairs with a cold beer in hand, wishing we could trade our chairs for a set of hammocks. Luke ran around barefoot and carefully guarded his bag of marshmallows from another little chipmunk who wasn’t really all that interested in Luke’s sugary snack.

A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com
A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com
A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com

After more lounging and napping in the shade, the sun started to dip in the sky. Our bellies grumbled hungrily as Andy prepped our food for dinner: Dutch Oven Beer Sausage. Brats, potatoes, mini bell peppers, and onions simmered in dark German beer for an hour made the best comfort food we could have imagined.

A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com
A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com
A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com
A family camping trip at Kenosha Pass Campground • twokidsintow.com

We roasted the few marshmallow left as the sun set behind the mountains to the west. As much as Andy and I wanted to stay up and sit by the fire, we were just as tired as the boys were after a full day of fun hiking and playing around the campground. Andy stayed with the fire to make sure it was properly out while I settled down with Luke and Jack in the trailer. The boys were sound asleep in no time, and Andy and I not far behind them.

Andy woke early the next morning. He started boiling water for coffee then poked his head back in the trailer and asked if I wanted to sit with him outside for a few minutes before the boys woke up. I carefully crawled out of the heap of warm bodies and out into the brisk air. We sipped and chatted softly as we slowly started breaking camp. It wasn’t long before we heard little squeals and giggles from inside the trailer. Just like at home, Jack was awake and deliriously happy to be alive and Luke was still out cold. I pulled the baby out, zipped him inside of his fleece suit, strapped him to my chest, and continued to pack up.

Luke awoke just before it was time to go. A quick breakfast and last visit to the bathroom later, we were all buckled up and ready to head home. Andy fired up the engine and off we drove, clothes smelling of campfire smoke and hearts full after a weekend spent in the mountains.

Trip Tips

Where to Stay

We camped in our trailer at Kenosha Pass Campground. Kenosha Pass has been our favorite campground so far this summer. Although there is some noise from Highway 285 nearby, we enjoyed our site, the clean facilities, and the proximity to the Colorado Trail. Lodgepole pines and aspen trees provide plenty of shade and relative privacy. We may book another weekend at the end of the season to catch the autumn colors.

Where to Play

Segments 5 and 6 of the Colorado Trail straddle Kenosha Pass Campground, separated by Highway 285. The Outbound Collective’s article Hiking at Kenosha Pass describes two out-and-back hikes, one headed east and the other headed west, that are certainly worth doing.